Speaking Cycle 10: Special occasions

champagne

1. Activating

· What different personal occasions do people typically celebrate during their life?

· What different ways do people typically mark these occasions?

2. Sharing

· Think about some of the personal occasions you have celebrated.

· Work in groups of three. Tell your group what you did to celebrate these occasions. As you listen to your partners, decide if you have ever celebrated personal occasions in similar ways.

3. Preparing

· Choose one experience of one member of your group. One of you is going to tell the rest of the class about this experience (it doesn’t matter if the person who speaks is the person who had the experience or if they talk about the experience of someone else in their group).

· Spend 15 minutes, as a group, preparing what the speaker is going to say. Think about a) information, such as what the occasion was; when and where it took place; who the person celebrated with; what the person did to celebrate the occasion; and why the celebration was particularly memorable; and b) the organisation and structure of what the speaker will say.

4. Performing

· The speaker from each group talks to the rest of the class.

· As you are listening to other speakers, try to answer the following questions:

a) What was the reason for the celebration?

b) When and where did the celebration take place?

c) What form did the celebration take?

d) What was particularly special or memorable about the celebration?

e) Have you ever celebrated a personal occasion in the same way?

5. Reporting

· When you have heard the speaker from each group, compare your answers to the questions with the other members of your group.

· As a group, decide which of the people you have heard about, in your opinion, enjoys celebrating personal occasions the most.

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Speaking Cycle 9: Bon voyage!

hitchhiker

1. Activating

· 1. Activating

· How many different ways of travelling can you think of?

· For what different reasons do people go on journeys?

2. Sharing

· Think about some memorable journeys you have made.

· Work in groups of three. Tell your group about these experiences. As you listen to your partners, decide if you have had any similar experiences yourself.

3. Preparing

· Choose one experience of one member of your group. One of you is going to tell the rest of the class about this experience (it doesn’t matter if the person who speaks is the person who had the experience or if they talk about the experience of someone else in their group).

· Spend 15 minutes, as a group, preparing what the speaker is going to say. Think about a) information, such as who went on the journey, and who were they with; where did they travel from and to, and how long did the journey take; how did they travel, and what was the reason for the journey; what made the journey memorable; and b) the organisation and structure of what the speaker will say.

4. Performing

· The speaker from each group talks to the rest of the class.

· As you are listening to other speakers, try to answer the following questions:

a) Who was the traveller?

b) Where did they travel from/to?

c) When did the journey take place and who was the person with?

d) What form of transport was used and what was the reason for the
journey?

e) Would you like to have a similar journey yourself?

5. Reporting

· When you have heard the speaker from each group, compare your answers to the questions with the other members of your group.

· As a group, decide which of the people you have heard about, in your opinion, had the most memorable travelling experience.

Speaking Cycle 8: Lifelong learning

learning

1. Activating

· How many different things can you think of which people might learn to do?

· What different ways might people learn how to do things?

2. Sharing

· Think about times when you have tried to learn something.

· Work in groups of three. Tell your group about these experiences. As you listen to your partners, decide if you have had any similar experiences yourself.

3. Preparing

· Choose one experience of one member of your group. One of you is going to tell the rest of the class about this experience (it doesn’t matter if the person who speaks is the person who had the experience or if they talk about the experience of someone else in their group).

· Spend 15 minutes, as a group, preparing what the speaker is going to say. Think about a) information, such as who was the learner; what were they trying to learn, and why; how long did they try for; how did they try to learn, and how successful were they; what did the experience teach them about learning; and b) the organisation and structure of what the speaker will say.

4. Performing

· The speaker from each group talks to the rest of the class.

· As you are listening to other speakers, try to answer the following questions:

a) Who was the learner?

b) What were they trying to learn, and why?

c) How did the person try to learn?

d) How successful was the learning experience?

e) Have you ever tried to learn the same thing?

5. Reporting

· When you have heard the speaker from each group, compare your answers to the questions with the other members of your group.

· As a group, decide which of the people you have heard about, in your opinion, had the most successful learning experience.

Speaking Cycle 7: Stop thief!

handcuffs

1. Activating

· How many different kinds of theft can you think of?

· What different reasons might people have for stealing?

2. Sharing

· Think about some times when you, or someone you know, were the victim of theft.

· Work in groups of three. Tell your group about these experiences. As you listen to your partners, decide if you have had any similar experiences yourself.

3. Preparing

· Choose one experience of one member of your group. One of you is going to tell the rest of the class about this experience (it doesn’t matter if the person who speaks is the person who had the experience or if they talk about the experience of someone else in their group).

· Spend 15 minutes, as a group, preparing what the speaker is going to say. Think about a) information, such as who was the victim; where and when the theft took place; what was stolen, and how; who the thief was; what happened afterwards; and b) the organisation and structure of what the speaker will say.

4. Performing

· The speaker from each group talks to the rest of the class.

· As you are listening to other speakers, try to answer the following questions:

a) When and where did the theft take place?

b) Who was the victim and who was the thief?

c) How did the theft take place?

d) What happened after the theft?

e) What would you do if you were the victim of a similar theft?

5. Reporting

· When you have heard the speaker from each group, compare your answers to the questions with the other members of your group.

· As a group, decide which of the people you have heard about, in your opinion, was most affected by the theft.

Speaking Cycle 6: Let’s celebrate!

celeb

1. Activating

· How many different kinds of national celebrations can you think of?

· What kinds of activities do you associate with national celebrations?

2. Sharing

· Think about some national celebrations which you have seen or participated in.

· Work in groups of three. Tell your group about your experiences at some of these. As you listen to your partners, decide if you have ever been to similar national celebrations yourself.

3. Preparing

· Choose one experience of one member of your group. One of you is going to tell the rest of the class about this experience (it doesn’t matter if the person who speaks is the person who had the experience or if they talk about the experience of someone else in their group).

· Spend 15 minutes, as a group, preparing what the speaker is going to say. Think about a) information, such as what kind of national celebration event it was; where and when it took place; what it celebrates, and how; who the person went with; what the person saw and did as part of the celebration; and b) the organisation and structure of what the speaker will say.

4. Performing

· The speaker from each group talks to the rest of the class.

· As you are listening to other speakers, try to answer the following questions:

a) When and where did the event take place?

b) What was the event celebrating, and how was it celebrated?

c) What did the person see and do at the event?

d) How did the person feel before, during and after the event?

e) Would you like to go to a similar event yourself?

5. Reporting

· When you have heard the speaker from each group, compare your answers to the questions with the other members of your group.

· As a group, decide which of the people you have heard about, in your opinion, most enjoys celebrating events of national importance.

Speaking Cycle 5: Learning English

images

1. Activating

· For what different reasons do people want to learn English as a second language?

· What kinds of problems to people encounter when they try to learn English?

2. Sharing

· Think of some ways you have tried to learn English in the past.

· Work in groups of three. Tell the rest of your group about the different ways you have tried to learn English. As you listen to your partners, decide if you have had any similar experiences to them.

3. Preparing

· Choose one experience of one member of your group. One of you is going to tell the rest of the class about this experience (it doesn’t matter if the person who speaks is the person who had the experience or if they talk about the experience of someone else in their group).

· Spend 15 minutes, as a group, preparing what the speaker is going to say. Think about a) information, such as when and why they were trying to learn English; what method they used; what what was good and bad about the method; would they recommend it to others; and b) the organisation and structure of what the speaker will say.

4. Performing

· The speaker from each group talks to the rest of the class.

· As you are listening to other speakers, try to answer the following questions:

a) Why was the person trying to learn English?

b) What did they do to try to learn English?

c) How long did they keep trying this method of learning English?

d) In what ways was the method successful/unsuccessful?

e) How effective would this method be for you?

5. Reporting

· When you have heard the speaker from each group, compare your answers to the questions with the other members of your group.

· As a group, decide which of the methods of learning English which you have heard about is, in your opinion, the most effective.

Speaking Cycle 4: Scary films!

Stephen-King-It

1. Activating

· How many different kinds of film can you think of?

· How do people normally feel when they watch each kind of film?

Short video extracts of the ‘Activating’ stage in action can be seen here:

Activating: eliciting types of films

Activating: eliciting how films make us feel

2. Sharing

· Think of some examples of scary films which you have seen.

· Work in groups of three. Tell the rest of your group about any scary films which you have seen. As you listen to your partners, decide if you have had any similar experiences watching a film.

3. Preparing

· Choose one experience of one member of your group. One of you is going to tell the rest of the class about this experience (it doesn’t matter if the person who speaks is the person who had the experience or if they talk about the experience of someone else in their group).

· Spend 15 minutes, as a group, preparing what the speaker is going to say. Think about a) information, such as what the film was, when and where the person saw it, and with whom; why it was scary; what effect the film had on the person; whether the person would be just as scared if they saw it again; and b) the organisation and structure of what the speaker will say.

4. Performing

· The speaker from each group talks to the rest of the class.

· As you are listening to other speakers, try to answer the following questions:

a) What is the name of the film?

b) When and where did the person see it, and who were they with?

c) Why did the person find the film scary?

d) How did the person feel after seeing the film?

e) How would you feel in the same situation?

5. Reporting

· When you have heard the speaker from each group, check your answers to the questions with the other members of your group.

· As a group, decide which film was the scariest and which of the people you have heard about is, in your opinion, most easily scared by films.